Question: What Are Supporting Details Examples?

What are examples of details?

The definition of detail is to describe or give information about something, or to clean and shine all parts of an automobile.

When you describe your plan to a friend, this is an example of when you detail your plan.

Washing and waxing the dashboard of a car is an example of a step to detail a car..

How do you teach supporting details?

Teaching Students That Details Should Support the Main Idea Before your main idea lesson, write a paragraph that has a very clear main idea. Then, add a sentence to the paragraph that is somewhat on topic, but doesn’t really support the main idea of the paragraph.

How do you identify a topic sentence and supporting details?

The topic sentence should identify the main idea and point of the paragraph. To choose an appropriate topic sentence, read the paragraph and think about its main idea and point. The supporting details in the paragraph (the sentences other than the topic sentence) will develop or explain the topic sentence.

What is the purpose of details?

“Details are what persuade us that someone is telling the truth—a fact that every liar knows instinctively and too well.

What are 3 supporting details?

SUPPORTING DETAILS • A paragraph contains facts, statements, examples-specifics which guide us to a full understanding of the main idea. They clarify, illuminate, explain, describe, expand and illustrate the main idea and are supporting details.

What are major supporting details?

Supporting details develop, explain, and support the main idea. … A major supporting detail provides essential information to help the reader understand the main idea. Whereas a major detail offers primary support of the main idea, a minor supporting detail offers more explanation of the major detail.

What are main ideas?

MAIN IDEAS The main idea is the central, or most important, idea in a paragraph or passage. It states the purpose and sets the direction of the paragraph or passage. • The main idea may be stated or it may be implied.

What are some examples of supporting details?

Some extra Hints – The supporting details in a sentence or a paragraph MIGHT begin with some of the following words: for example, for instance, in addition, another, in fact, furthermore, moreover, therefore, as a result, consequently, first, second, third, next, then, last, finally, etc…

What are supporting sentences examples?

Supporting sentences should fit the context and flow of a paragraph. Example: If a paragraph was written about the closing of the Family Tree Store in town, a good supporting sentence of this topic would be: The Family Tree Store that has been opened since 1901 is closing tomorrow.

How do you identify supporting details?

Use a three-step process to identify supporting details.Step 1: Identify the topic. … Step 2: Identify what the author is saying about the topic. … Step 3: Identify details that support or explain the main idea. … Step 1: Identify the topic. … Step 2: Identify what the author is saying about the topic.More items…

What are key details?

Key details: In the context of literature, key details relate to story grammar elements—that is, character, setting, problem, major events, and resolution—and how they interact.

What is another word for supporting details?

supporting details > synonyms »additional information exp. »details n. »specific details exp. »supporting examples exp.

How do you explain details?

10 ways to explain things more effectively.Keep in mind others’ point of view. … Listen and respond to questions. … Avoid talking over student’s head or talking down to them. … Ask questions to determine student’s understanding. … Take it step by step. … Use direct eye contact. … Use analogies to make concepts clearer.More items…

How do you write details?

Using the Best Details in Your WritingUse the Best Details You Can Imagine. When you sit down to think of the right details, the ones which come readily to mind will most likely be commonplace. … Don’t Use Too Many Details. It is quality that counts in descriptive writing, not quantity. … Some Details are Better if they “Move”