Could Found Or Could Find?

Could not find or found Which is correct?

Re: I could not find it ‘I could not find it’ is correct because the bare infinitive ‘find’ is used after the modal verb ‘could’..

Did you find VS have you found?

The simple past: “Did you find the papers?” The present perfect simple: “Have you found the papers?” The use of the simple past: This past time describes, in particular, that the described act or state took place at one particular time in the past.

How do you use Find and found in a sentence?

We use find + [something] and find + [someone]. The usual grammar is find + noun. Remember, find is an irregular verb, so we say find, found, found….Here are some examples:I finally found out her email address.I found out the chef was from Taiwan.Did you find out why Jack got fired?

Can be found or find?

If you presume they have already looked at the list, use “found”. If you would like them to review the list, but they haven’t done so, use “find”. So, since you are putting the sentence below the list, “found” makes sense. But if you were to put that sentence ABOVE the list, you would need to use “find”.

Did not found or find?

As you wrote, only “I did not find” is correct. “I did not found” is an error. (There is also a verb “to found,” but its meaning is different and it is not related to “find.” “Find,” with its past tense “found,” comes from Old High German. “Found,” as a separate verb, comes from Latin.)

Did he see or saw?

Saw has two different meanings… one is the past tense of the verb “to see” and the other one is a noun meaning a tool. However that noun became the verb to describe the action of the tool. Robert is correct in saying “Did you saw” is grammatically incorrect.

Did you find found?

Then it remains in the original form. Therefore when ‘did’ has been used to make the main verb interrogative , the main verb ‘ found’ will come back to bare infinitive form ‘ find’. ‘Did you find? ‘ is correct.

What tense is found?

Found is the past tense and past participle of find. When an institution, company, or organization is founded by someone or by a group of people, they get it started, often by providing the necessary money.

Did found or did find?

Where did you find it? Yes, in such questions you should use the verb do. Note that after do you should use the bare form of the verb: find, not found. The verb do carries the Past Tense, being transformed into did, so there’s no need for find to carry the Past Tense too.

Have you found it yet meaning?

The other sense of the word found is the past and past participle of the verb find, meaning to “discover” or “locate”: I found my keys under my jacket. We found oil while drilling in those fields over there. So your sentence (“Have you found your keys yet?”) is indeed grammatically correct.

Had found or had find?

They are all forms of past tense. I found = the simple past. … I had found = the past perfect tense. I have had found: I am not familiar with this usage; perhaps you were mistaken that it is a tense at all.

What I found or what I have found?

Both of them are correct, they just mean slightly different things. I’ve found, which is the present perfect, means “as of this moment, I found someone (in the past)”; the present perfect is used to indicate that an action happened some time in the past but is related to the present.

Could have shown or showed?

A: The usual past participle of “show” (that is, the form of the verb used with “had” or “have”) is “shown.” But “showed” is also acceptable and not a mistake. Dictionaries these days consider both of them standard English, but list “shown” first.

How did you find it meaning?

Asking, “How did you find [something]” to query someone’s opinion or experience doesn’t seem to relate directly “find” in the context of locating something. Even as a metaphor, referring to the act of locating something rarely includes a description of the thing itself.

Did see or did saw?

“When I did see” is much more emphatic the “when I saw.” When we want to stress something, we can use “do” or “did” (depending on the tense we need to use) before the notional verb: I hardly ever leave the country. When I do leave the country, I try to make the most of the trip.